Sweeney, Caitriona

Caitriona Sweeney is a writer and illustration artist from Dublin. A Galway Fairytale is her fourth book as an illustrator, but the first she has written as well as illustrated. She is an admirer of nice woolly jumpers, so enjoyed painting several of them into this book.

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Sweeney, Eamonn

Eamonn Sweeney was born in 1968 in the nearly hurling-free county of Sligo, a deficiency remedied by his hurling-mad father from Kilkenny. He has written on sports for the Irish Examiner for a number of years, and is the author of two novels, The Photograph and Waiting for the Healer, a book on soccer, There's Only One Red Army, and a play, Bruen's Twis. Eamonn now lives in County Cork and regularly broadcasts on RTÉ radio and television on a wide variety of topics. Sport, however, remains his first love.
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Swift, Jonathan

Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), was the author of Gulliver's Travels, one of the world's greatest satirical fantasies. He was Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin from 1713-1745.

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Tarrant, Margaret

Margaret Tarrant was a prolific English illustrator that created posters, greeting cards, calendars, postcards and books for fifty years. She was most popular during the 1920’s and 1930’s for her romantic depiction of children, fairies and animals. She died on 28 July 1959.
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Taylor, Alice

Alice Taylor lives in the village of Innishannon in County Cork, in a house attached to the local supermarket and post office. Since her eldest son has taken over responsibility for the shop, she has been able to devote more time to her writing.

Alice Taylor worked as a telephonist in Killarney and Bandon. When she married, she moved to Innishannon where she ran a guesthouse at first, then the supermarket and post office. She and her husband, Gabriel Murphy, who sadly passed away in 2005, had four sons and one daughter. In 1984 she edited and published the first issue of Candlelight, a local magazine which has since appeared annually. In 1986 she published an illustrated collection of her own verse.

To School Through the Fields was published in May 1988. It was an immediate success, and quickly became the biggest selling book ever published in Ireland. It launched Alice on a series of signing sessions, talks and readings the length and breadth of Ireland. Her first radio interview, forty two minutes long on RTÉ Radio's Gay Byrne Show, was the most talked about radio programme of 1988, and her first television interview, of the same length, was the highlight of the year on RTÉ television's Late Late Show. Since then she has appeared on radio programmes such as Woman's Hour, Midweek and The Gloria Hunniford Show, and she has been the subject of major profiles in the Observer and the Mail on Sunday.

Alice has written nearly twenty books since then, large exploring her village of Inishannon, and the way of life in rural Ireland. She has also written poetry and fiction: her first novel, The Woman of the House, was an immediate bestseller in Ireland, topping the paperback fiction lists for many weeks.

One of Ireland's most popular authors, her most recent book is And Life Lights Up.

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Taylor, Marilyn

Marilyn Taylor was born and educated in England, and has an economics degree from London University. She was a school librarian in a Dublin secondary school for 16 years and a college librarian.

Her first novels for young adults were the Jackie and Kev trilogy, Could This Be Love, I Wondered? (1994),  Could I Love a Stranger? and Call Yourself a Friend?.

Faraway Home was a new departure for Marilyn, having a strong historical basis and being set in Northern Ireland during the Second World War. It won the prestigious Bisto Book of the Year Award and was followed by 17 Martin Street, set in Dublin during The Emergency (as the Second World War was knows in Ireland). Both have been hugely popular with schools throughout Ireland and beyond.

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